Source : AHA

Auteur : Marco Roffi, and al.


ABSTRACT

COVID-19 infection, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARSCoV-2), poses a double threat to public health; the immediate one is the morbidity and mortality related to the infection; the more subtle one is the shift of attention and resources away from the care of “regular” diseases.


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Source : International Society of Blood Transfusion

Auteur : Pierre Tiberghien and al.


ABSTRACT :

Plasma provided by COVID-19 convalescent patients may provide therapeutic relief as the number CODID-19 cases escalate steeply world-wide. Prior findings in various viral respiratory diseases including SARS-CoV related pneumonia suggest that convalescent plasma can reduce mortality, although formal proof of efficacy is still lacking. By reducing viral spread early on, such an approach may possibly downplay subsequent immunopathology. Identifying, collecting, qualifying and preparing plasma from convalescent patients with adequate SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing Ab titers in an acute crisis setting may be challenging, although well within the remit of most blood establishments. Careful clinical evaluation should allow to quickly establish whether such passive immunotherapy, administered at early phases of the disease in patients at high risk of deleterious evolution may reduce the frequency of patient deterioration, and thereby COVID -19 mortality.

Keywords: COVID -19, convalescent plasma, plasma, infectious disease, antibody


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Source : International Society of Blood Transfusion

Auteur : Massimo Franchini and al.


ABSTRACT :

Coronaviruses are enveloped single-stranded RNA viruses belonging to the family of Coronaviridae. While initial research focused on their ability to cause enzootic infections, infections that have emerged in the past two decades demonstrate their ability to cross the species barrier and infect humans [1,2]. The ensuing epidemics have included severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and the more recent Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in 2012 and have resulted in severe disease burden, mortality and economic disruption [3]. A novel flu-like coronavirus, emerging towards the end of 2019 and subsequently named SARS-CoV-2, has been associated with an epidemic initially focused in Wuhan, China. SARS-CoV-2 belongs to the same group (b-coronavirus) of coronaviruses responsible of SARS and MERS.


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Source : Transfusion Medicine Reviews

Auteur : Le Chang and al.


ABSTRACT :

With the outbreak of unknown pneumonia in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, a new coronavirus, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), aroused the attention of the entire world. The current outbreak of infections with SARS-CoV-2 is termed Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 in China as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Two other coronavirus infections—SARS in 2002-2003 and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in 2012—both caused severe respiratory syndrome in humans. All 3 of these emerging infectious diseases leading to a global spread are caused by β-coronaviruses. Although coronaviruses usually infect the upper or lower respiratory tract, viral shedding in plasma or serum is common. Therefore, there is still a theoretical risk of transmission of coronaviruses through the transfusion of labile blood products. Because more and more asymptomatic infections are being found among COVID-19 cases, considerations of blood safety and coronaviruses have arisen especially in endemic areas. In this review, we detail current evidence and understanding of the transmission of SARS-CoV, MERS– CoV, and SARS-CoV-2 through blood products as of February 10, 2020, and also discuss pathogen inactivation methods on coronaviruses.


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