Source : BMJ GH Auteur : Wim Van Damme and al.

ANALYSE

Commentateur

Dr Moitry Marie

Objectifs et Résultats

Un article qui tente de comprendre pourquoi les trajectoires de l’épidémie varient visiblement d’un contexte (pays) à l’autre
  • Il liste les différents facteurs qui pourraient expliquer ces disparités, à la fois liés aux caractéristiques du virus (infectiosité, potentiel mutagène, capacité à survivre en dehors de l’autre…), à l’hôte (susceptibilité au virus, voies de transmission, immunité post infectieuse…), à l’environnement physique (conditions climatiques et atmosphériques…).
  • Il évoque également les effets de l’environnement humain (démographie, conditions socio-économiques conditions d’hygiène, mobilité…), et des comportements : compliance aux mesures collectives (confinement) et individuelles (hygiène des mains, port du masque…).
  • Il rappelle que les effets propres de ces différents facteurs sont difficiles (voire impossible…) à quantifier, au moins pour le moment
  • Enfin, il fait également le point sur les connaissances actuelles sur l’épidémie et ses trajectoires potentielles.

Points intéressants 

  • il rappelle que des pandémies liées à des virus émergeants restent exceptionnelles…. Un effet (entre autres) de la circulation visiblement “continue” du virus quel que soit le contexte ? (Comme le HIV ?)


31 juillet 2020 Articles scientifiques

Source : Daniel P. Oran, AM, and Eric J. Topol, MD Auteur : Annals of Internal Medicine , 2020 American College of Physicians

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly throughout the world since the first cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were observed in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. It has been suspected that infected persons who remain asymptomatic play a significant role in the ongoing pandemic, but their relative number and effect have been uncertain. The authors sought to review and synthesize the available evidence on asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection. Asymptomatic persons seem to account for approximately 40% to 45% of SARS-CoV-2 infections, and they can transmit the virus to others for an extended period, perhaps longer than 14 days. Asymptomatic infection may be associated with subclinical lung abnormalities, as detected by computed tomography. Because of the high risk for silent spread by asymptomatic persons, it is imperative that testing programs include those without symptoms. To supplement conventional diagnostic testing, which is constrained by capacity, cost, and its one-off nature, innovative tactics for public health surveillance, such as crowdsourcing digital wearable data and monitoring sewage sludge, might be helpful.  

31 juillet 2020 Articles scientifiques

Source : BMJ 2020;370:m2993 | doi: 10.1136/bmj.m2993 Auteur : Owen Dyer

Most US states are missing key indicators in the data they publish about the course of the covid-19 pandemic, says a report presented by Tom Frieden, former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report by Resolve to Save Lives, a New York based non-profit group led by Frieden, examined the covid-19 “dashboards” of all 50 states and the District of Columbia.1 Indicators critical to understanding the pandemic’s course were often missing, it found. Not a single state currently reports the average turnaround time of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, as press reports abound of tests in many regions taking a week or more to come back, a delay that renders testing nearly useless in controlling the disease’s spread. The test positivity rate goes unreported by 25% of states. Resolve to Save Lives, which is part of the global health organisation Vital Strategies, listed 15 indicators that are routinely used in other countries’ reporting and examined the performance of each US state on each indicator. These indicators include syndromic reporting of influenza-like illness, reported by 10 states, and covid-like illness, reported by 18 states. These two are considered leading indicators, allowing a faster response than the trailing indicators of hospital admissions and deaths.

30 juillet 2020 Articles scientifiques

Source : BMJ Global Health 2020 Auteur : Van Damme W, et al.

ABSTRACT

It is very exceptional that a new disease becomes a true pandemic. Since its emergence in Wuhan, China, in late 2019, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes COVID-19, has spread to nearly all countries of the world in only a few months. However, in different countries, the COVID-19 epidemic takes variable shapes and forms in how it affects communities. Until now, the insights gained on COVID-19 have been largely dominated by the COVID-19 epidemics and the lockdowns in China, Europe and the USA. But this variety of global trajectories is little described, analysed or understood. In only a few months, an enormous amount of scientific evidence on SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 has been uncovered (knowns). But important knowledge gaps remain (unknowns). Learning from the variety of ways the COVID-19 epidemic is unfolding across the globe can potentially contribute to solving the COVID-19 puzzle. This paper tries to make sense of this variability—by exploring the important role that context plays in these different COVID-19 epidemics; by comparing COVID-19 epidemics with other respiratory diseases, including other coronaviruses that circulate continuously; and by highlighting the critical unknowns and uncertainties that remain. These unknowns and uncertainties require a deeper understanding of the variable trajectories of COVID-19. Unravelling them will be important for discerning potential future scenarios, such as the first wave in virgin territories still untouched by COVID-19 and for future waves elsewhere.


Source : Medrxiv (PRE-PRINT)

Auteur : Takahashi and al.


ABSTRACT

Vous A growing body of evidence indicates sex differences in the clinical outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)1-4. However, whether immune responses against SARS-CoV-2 differ between sexes, and whether such differences explain male susceptibility to COVID-19, is currently unknown. In this study, we examined sex differences in viral loads, SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody titers, plasma cytokines, as well as blood cell phenotyping in COVID-19 patients. By focusing our analysis on patients with mild to moderate disease who had not received immunomodulatory medications, our results revealed that male patients had higher plasma levels of innate immune cytokines and chemokines including IL-8, IL-18, and CCL5, along with more robust induction of non-classical monocytes. In contrast, female patients mounted significantly more robust T cell activation than male patients during SARS-CoV-2 infection, which was sustained in old age. Importantly, we found that a poor T cell response negatively correlated with patients age and was predictive of worse disease outcome in male patients, but not in female patients. Conversely, higher innate immune cytokines in female patients associated with worse disease progression, but not in male patients. These findings reveal a possible explanation underlying observed sex biases in COVID-19, and provide important basis for the development of sex-based approach to the treatment and care of men and women with COVID-19.

Vous pouvez télécharger l’analyse ICI.


Télécharger l’article complet


Source : Immunity 52, May 19, 2020

Auteur : Haley E. Randolph and Luis B. Barreiro


The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its associated disease, COVID-19, has demonstrated the devastating impact of a novel, infectious pathogen on a susceptible population. Here, we explain the basic concepts of herd immunity and discuss its implications in the context of COVID-19.


Télécharger l’article complet


SourceNature (2020) Auteur : Seth Flaxman, Swapnil Mishra, Axel Gandy, H. Juliette T. Unwin, Thomas A. Mellan, Helen Coupland, Charles Whittaker, Harrison Zhu, Tresnia Berah, Jeffrey W. Eaton, Mélodie Monod, Imperial College COVID-19 Response Team, Azra C. Ghani, Christl A. Donnelly, Steven M. Riley, Michaela A. C. Vollmer, Neil M. Ferguson, Lucy C. Okell & Samir Bhatt

ANALYSE

Commentateur

Dr Moitry Marie

Objectifs et Résultats

  • Étude de modélisation dont l’objectif est d’estimer les effets de 5 interventions mises en place dans 11 pays européens (distanciation physique, fermeture des écoles, interdiction des grands rassemblements, isolement des cas et confinement), notamment sur le nombre de décès évités
  • En prenant en compte la variété des politiques dans les différents pays, le nombre de décès évités s’élèverait à plus de 3 millions dans les 11 pays, dont près de 700 000 en France (données au 4 mai). Le confinement aurait eu l’effet le plus important. Environ 5% de la population française serait immunisée (proche des estimations de l’institut Pasteur).

Points forts

  • Article reviewé
  • Données sur le nombre de cas et de décès issues de la base de l’ECDC (European Center of Disease Control) ; disponibilité des données initiales et simulées ainsi que des codes sources des analyses
  • Suivi des mesures prises par les différents pays au fur et à mesure, selon les sources gouvernementales
  • Chiffres obtenus avec le modèle fidèle aux données recueillies
  • Analyses par pays, détaillées, méthodes et résultats clairs et exhaustifs.

    Points faibles

  • Article non finalisé (processus accéléré)
  • Etude de modélisation, avec de nombreuses hypothèses
  • Impossibilité de prendre en compte l’effet propre de chaque mesure et les changements spontanés de comportements en population
  • Disparités de décompte des décès entre pays, sous-estimation possible du nombre de cas (dépistages limités).

Vous pouvez télécharger l’analyse ICI.  


Source : JAMA. Published online June 3, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.10044 Auteur : Ling LiWei ZhangYu Hu; et al

ANALYSE

Commentateur

Dr REY David

Objectif

Evaluer l’efficacité et la tolérance de transfusion de plasma de personnes convalescentes (guérison depuis au moins 2 semaines, PCR négativée 2 fois, 18-55 ans, vérification sérologie COVID).

Points forts

Etude randomisée comparative.

Points faibles

Fin d’étude prématurée (fin d’épidémie), donc effectif inférieur aux 200 patients prévus. Autres traitements possibles (antiviraux, corticoïdes), sans “contrôle” entre les 2 groupes.

Conclusion

Globalement pas de bénéfice clinique de la transfusion de plasma; petit bénéfice pour les formes sévères sans engagement du pronostic vital. Négativation des PCR plus rapides après transfusion de plasma. Vous pouvez télécharger l’analyse ICI.  


Source : JAMA. Published online June 3, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.10044 Auteur : Pilar VizcarraMaría J Pérez-ElíasCarmen QueredaAna MorenoMaría J VivancosFernando Dronda,  José L Casado, on behalf of the COVID-19 ID Team.

ANALYSE

Commentateur

Dr REY David

Objectif

Décrire le taux d’infection, et les caracéristiques cliniques, des infections COVID chez les patients adultes vivant avec le VIH.

Points faibles

Possible surestimation en incluant des cas suspects donc non confirmés, mais aussi de sous-estimation compte-tenu des recommandations locales limitant les frottis diagnostiques.

Conclusion

Taux d’infection COVID de 1,8% dans cette cohorte de PVVIH (1,2% pour les cas confirmés, versus 0,9% dans la population générale de la région). Présentation clinique et radiologique comparable à la population générale. 6 formes sévères (12%) dont 2 ont des CD4 < 200/mm3, et 2 décès (4%). Pas d’effet protecteur des ARV. La prise en charge doit être la même que pour les personnes non infectées par le VIH. Vous pouvez télécharger l’analyse ICI.  

© Les Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg 2020 - Tous droits réservés